Summer of Learning Design Challenge #3: Rubber Bands

Check in here every Friday for a new Design Challenge. We will provide you with ideas for a full summer of fun things to make and do. It is all part of summer fun for kids and teens at the Kitsap Regional Library.

Rubber bands; this simple tool is used by individuals and industries all over the world for a variety of practical purposes.

Rubberbands
Photo credit: Rubber Bands by eek the cat on Flickr

Most rubber bands are made with latex, a milky fluid that comes from the rubber tree (Hevea brasileinsis) or other plants, trees, and shrubs that grow in equatorial areas. The first rubber band was developed in 1843. Over decades, several individuals contributed the process of making and perfecting the rubber band that we all know and use today. Encyclopedia.com

To see how rubber bands are made, check out this short video:

Now that we know a little more about rubber bands and how they are made, let’s use them to build, create, learn, and have fun.

You could make a catapult airplane.

Photo Credit: minieco.co.uk
Photo Credit: minieco.co.uk

 

Or make a stylish bracelet.

Photo Credit: thecraftyblogstalker.com/
Photo Credit: thecraftyblogstalker.com/

 

Rock out with a rubber band guitar.

Photo Credit: www.statelibraryofiowa.org/
Photo Credit: www.statelibraryofiowa.org/

 

Build a rubber band powered car.

Photo Credit: http://www.learningfun101.com/
Photo Credit: http://www.learningfun101.com/

 

 

Make a rubber band rocket.

Photo Credit: www.instructables.com
Photo Credit: www.instructables.com

 

Or beat the current Guinness World Record holder for largest rubber band ball.

 

Need more inspiration? Check out the Flying Machine Book or Amazing Rubber Band Cars.

Jacket-1Jacket

And for students in grades 5-8, who can’t get enough of Rubber Bands, consider entering the 7th annual Rubber Band Contest for Young Inventors.

We’d love to see what you come up with. Email your photos to Digital Branch Manager Sharon Grant at sgrant@krl.org for possible inclusion in a future blog post (under 1 MB file size please) or stop by your library to show off your creativity.

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